Our forefathers were prepared to deal with worst-case scenarios with the minimum amount of resources, totally independent from electricity, cars, or modern technology whatsoever.

They also managed to be bulletproof against the ever-increasing threats of powerful economic breakdowns, famines, and natural disasters. They had the power to protect and save their family… and even to rebuild their communities during the worst of times.

I’m pretty sure that you are familiar with this 150-year-old saying that

“It is not the strongest species that survived, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change.”

So, we at Survivopedia put together the most useful information one can get, information that offer you the opportunity to take part in doing something GREAT: saving our forefathers’ lost skills!

How to Outlive an EMP the Early Pioneer Way

This is a day-by-day guide that shows you what to do after an EMP every day, for 30 days, using The Lost Ways. Think about it this way: If an EMP had struck in the late 1800s, nobody would’ve noticed it. Our great grandparents didn’t even know what an EMP was, nor did they know what modern technology was, but they surely lived, survived, and prospered without it.

Now things are a little bit different. And because this event can happen all of a sudden, with no warning whatsoever, it might be difficult even for the smartest minds to know what to do from the moment the running water stops and your food spoils to the moment when looters come knocking at your door. So you’ll need these 10 things that you should do on day one, what to make on day 2, what you definitely need to turn to on day 3, and so on ’till day 30, when you’ll be absolutely 100% self-sufficient, protected, and able to help others if you want to. Unless you’re living in a bunker full of stockpiles, doing these things in the wrong order may literally mean death.

Another old saying people used to say is:

“For every minute you spent organizing, an hour is earned.”

A Step-by-Step Guide to Building Your Own Can Rotation System

This can hold at least 700 cans of different sizes. You will never have to look at 50 cans for expiration dates, and you’ll never need to throw away cans again because they’ve spoiled. A can rotator is not only a time saver but also a money saver. The mechanism is very simple. Whenever you buy new cans, you insert them in the upper shelf. The cans will automatically roll down, and they will be the last in the row. When you pick them up, you do so from the shelf below, so you will always pick the can that you bought first and therefore with the closest expiration date.

Cool and efficient! The one that you’ve just seen in the video I built with only $95. Pretty cheap if you think that a similar rotator costs $420 on Amazon and holds only 450 cans. And theirs aren’t even that cool!

Once you have the plans and the step by step guide with pictures, all it takes is just one day of work, even less.

By knowing the ways of our forefathers, believe it or not, you’re covered for anything. You’ll never have to spend money on any prepping material again. Forget about unreliable and expensive modern survival equipment. Why even bother reinventing the wheel when these things have been working right for centuries?

And the best part is that you don’t need to wait for a disaster to happen. The self-reliance our grand grandparents had will help you save hundreds of dollars every month starting from day ONE.

Now, I consider that I’ve done my part: the hardest and costliest part if I may say so. All you need to do is to make sure you hand this knowledge over when it’s time to and take full advantage of it until then. I’ve shown it to some expert preppers and readers of Survivopedia, and some of them even said they would easily pay $1000 just to learn these skills alone. And now you can do it a lot cheaper by clicking the image below…

The Lost Ways

 

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Growing encyclopedia of survival, your source of uncommon wisdom for dangerous times.

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