Stock Your Home With These Items Before SHTF

It’s the end of the world, as you know it, but you feel fine. Why?

Because your tiny house has everything you need to get by. Okay, the Apocalypse isn’t really upon us, but you need to prepare for the unexpected. Even though tiny living involves downsizing, adding these must-haves means you’ll be ready for any disaster.

Portability

The great thing about a tiny house is that it’s easy to pick up and move when disaster strikes. Invest in a tiny house trailer so you and your home can make a quick get-away when necessary. You’ll have a head start evacuating an area since you won’t have to spend time packing.

Collapsible Items

No matter how many square feet surround you, you still must eat. You can whip up a quick lunch or a gourmet meal using space-saving collapsible cookware. You’ll find cooking pots made of stainless steel, silicone, and glass that flatten to a disc smaller than a Frisbee. Boil water in a teapot and strain spaghetti in a collapsible colander. Put your leftovers in collapsible containers. Even wash the dishes in a tub that collapses to a flat shape. If you need it in the kitchen, chances are good you can find it in a collapsible form.

Food

An impending cataclysmic event like a hurricane, typhoon, or even a blizzard in the forecast will empty the store shelves fast. Once the disaster hits, the grocery stores close. But your tiny home will be stocked up on fresh fruit and vegetables thanks to your garden. You don’t need a lot of floor space or a huge yard to grow food. A vertical garden will give you more than enough room to grow the essentials around your tiny home. Climbing plants like pole beans, cucumbers, peas, tomatoes, and winter squash can easily grow up a trellis.

Hydroponic gardens allow you to grow fruit and vegetables inside year-round. And you don’t need soil. This is a must-have if the impending disaster keeps you indoors.

Houseplants

Just because you’re living tiny, doesn’t mean you can’t create a pleasant environment. Your vegetable plants will help, but adding several more small houseplants will brighten your home and help keep you healthy. Houseplants can remove up to 87% of air toxins in 24 hours. Plants with broad leaves can help regulate humidity. So, what do you choose? A tiny house calls for tiny plants. Succulents work well in small homes. A succulent stores water in its leaves, stem, or both. They release oxygen at night, leading to better sleep, especially in limited space. Many indoor succulents stay small, making them an excellent choice for your tiny home. There are many choices when it comes to houseplants that add to your decor. Consider Bonsai, Air Plants, or Anthurium. Choose one or mix and match. Houseplants make your tiny house feel like a home.

First Aid

You won’t be the only one running for cover when disaster strikes. Plenty of creatures, including the poisonous pests, are also looking for a place to hide and keep warm. In Dallas, for example, copperheads and rattlesnakes like the wilderness as much as you, and they could easily make their way inside your tiny home. Black Widows and brown recluse spiders are good at hiding, and surprising you. Stock up on anti-venom just in case the unthinkable happens.

You’ll also need a supply of bandages, aspirin, and safety pins. Other items in a basic first aid kit include:

  • Adhesive tape
  • Superglue
  • Rubber tourniquet
  • Eyeshield or pad and eyewash
  • Large triangular bandage (to use as a sling)
  • Cold packs
  • Cotton balls
  • Duct tape
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Scissors and tweezers
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Thermometer
  • Turkey baster for flushing wounds
  • First-aid manual
  • Hydrogen peroxide to disinfect

It wouldn’t hurt to put a few surgical masks in your kit. You never know what kind of disaster will hit.

Containers

Even standard size houses can lack storage, so coming up with enough of it in a tiny home is especially challenging. Circular containers take up a lot of space, so look for square ones. You can stack them tightly and push them against a wall. Dry baking goods, like flour and sugar, breakfast cereal, chips, and pretzels, need less room when poured into a square container. You can even put cold items in them and stack them in your small refrigerator. Durable, airtight containers will do the trick. And don’t forget slightly larger containers for toys, clothes, and pet necessities. Your motto, when it comes to containers, is stackable!

Fresh Water and Water Filter

Finding water won’t be a problem in a blizzard, but fresh drinking water will be in short supply in a hurricane or nuclear holocaust. Keep a couple of gallons in the freezer. When the power goes out, you’ll be able to keep things cool for a few days. A portable water filter will also allow you to fetch water from streams.

Hooks

You’re looking for ways to use every square inch of space in your tiny home. Furniture takes up most of the floor, but you still have the walls. That’s where hooks come in handy. Use wall hooks to hold hats, bags, sports equipment, and shoes. In your sleeping space, store your jewelry and accessories on hooks. You can use them in every room. Put them as high as you can, maximizing wall space. Solid, sturdy hooks work best. Get creative and incorporate them into your home decor.

The great thing about a tiny house is that it’s easy to pick up and move when disaster strikes. Invest in a tiny house trailer so you and your home can make a quick get-away when necessary. You’ll have a head start evacuating an area since you won’t have to spend time packing.

Surviving tiny house living (not to mention, the Apocalypse!) is a matter of being ready. Stocking up on these items can help make your journey a smooth one.

Written by

Carmen Dexter is a freelance journalist and teacher who enjoys growing her own organic food and recycling as much as possible.

Latest comments
  • It’s nice to say “stock up on anti-venom (or antibiotics,etc) but these items are medical and need an Rx, and then with antivenom it usually needs to be refrigerated, so how would the average person get these? And dont forget about expiration dates. Any advice on this?

  • The idea that you can grow enough food to feed yourself in a tiny home or a small hydroponic set-up is misleading, at best, and an outright lie, at worst. You may be able to grow a few herbs or a couple of tomato and pepper plants, but not much more, and those certainly won’t keep you alive. I’ve been gardening for nearly fifty years and it takes a large plot of land to feed yourself. My garden measures 50′ X 30′ which is about the minimum amount of ground it would take to feed a single person. I grow corn, potatoes and green beans (all of which are staple crops), in addition to other desirable crops such as tomatoes, peppers, onions, garlic, squash, cucumbers, melons, broccoli, and strawberries. Even with my 1500 sq. ft. of garden space, I must cram all of those crops into the available ground, and it leaves me with no room to spare. There is absolutely NO way that anyone is going to fit a 1500 sq. ft. garden into a window box on a tiny house, or a small hydroponic set-up!

    The crops that will keep you alive and which you can store, long-term, such as corn, potatoes and green beans, take up large tracts of ground. You can’t grow them in a window box planter. You may be able to grow five or six bean plants, but those few plants will only produce a total of about three or four pounds of green (not dried) beans. If you allow the beans to stay on the plants and dry for long-term storage, you’re talking a total of maybe half-a-pound of dry beans. Obviously, that’s not enough to feed you and keep you alive for a year. Even if you grow the beans, indoors, so that you can grow them year-round, it takes beans 2 – 3 months from planting to harvest, so you’re still talking only a few pounds of beans per year — not enough to live on.

    Here’s a statistic to put things in perspective: It requires 33 ACRES of land to grow enough food to feed the average American. That figure includes the land to grow feed crops for the cattle, hogs, chickens, etc. that we eat in the form of meat. It also includes the land to grow fruit and nut trees, and sugar cane or sugar beets so you can sweeten your coffee and bake cakes and cookies. Still . . . 33 acres is a HUGE amount of land. The average plot of land for a residential home is 1/4 acre. So, you’re talking the amount of space occupied by 132 homes to feed ONE person! Now, do you understand why we have “factory farms” in America? Obviously, no one is going to be concerned with growing fruit trees, sugar and cattle feed in a TEOTWAWKI situation . . . at least, not at first. Food for survival is what we’ll all need and the 1500 sq ft. of garden space in my yard is about the minimum amount of land required for that purpose.

    So, please, let’s stop this nonsense about being able to feed yourself, and your family, from a couple of tiny planter boxes! People who don’t know anything about gardening are liable to believe that crap and, when we have a SHTF situation, it may end up getting them killed by starvation.

    • thanks Dale

    • Traditional gardening, yes. However you can do an amazing amount of gardening on less than that for more people. You absolutely do not need 33 acre, unless you are growing grain. You can actually have a mid size green house fish tank for protein, irrigation, and fertilizer) and 1/2 acre of intense farming in the summer, to have and store enough food for about 6 people. Small garden tactics, grow lights (need electricity of course or solar) for micro greens in the house, potatoes in 5 gallons buckets, and many other tactics can give you a good supply of food. Not what you may be accustomed to, but survivable. Combined with dry pack foods, stored grains, etc., you can survive and thrive for q long time. . Granted, not in a tiny house, unless it is just you.

    • Well said Dale.

    • Hi there Dale. I have to heartily disagree. A 1000 sq.. ft. of raised beds makes so much food I am feeding the neighbors AND canning AND dehydrating And blanching and freezing…to get harvests one needs education. Period. Making beef jerky is easy. Pickles and salsas canned carrots, beets, potatoes, tomato everythings, Horse radish…water cress, rhubarb, boysenberries, raspberries….building one’s own dehydrator with 5 or 6 18 X 18 inch gal. mesh shelves. Dried tomatoes…Strawberries, dried! Blueberries frozen.. Onions and garlic…we devoted an entire bed to garlic we started in the fall this year. Rotation is so important but it takes two years before being able to plant the same genus again in that soil. that is a hard and fast rule.. Cucumbers take little room and I can barely keep up making pickles. Out of a 6X6 bed. 60 quarts of pickles? I enlarge my gardening real estate using pots. Always with potting soil NOT garden soil for Tomatoes, Potatoes, Egg Plant, Peppers all in the same family while the beds get through 2 years of ‘fallow’ of that species. I grow indetermi9nate tomatoes that climb vertically as well as other vines. Pole beans. Peas… We added 400 square feet of a garden that is not covered with a greenhouse skin. This is major experimentation while we preserve, give away, dehydrate, keep in a cool cellar. Practice is important. Using certified seed whenever possible.

    • Good work on your article, Carmen !
      Dale, I hate to rain on your parade, but I must – just the facts. (From 35 years of experience). If Anyone is Not Growing (Only Heritage/ Open Pollinated Varieties) – of Dry Beans, Rutabagas, Sweet Potatoes, Garbanzos (aka chick peas), Hard Corn, Winter Squash, Andean Grains, and Alliums (esp. Garlic) – then they Cannot produce enough Nutrition for any human. Talk and argument won’t change the Caloric/ Nutrients supplied.

    • Thank.You.DALE! Sometimes you need a little more experience to get things into clear view 🙂

  • You are absolutely right Dale. I have planted and harvested a few crops in my time. Folks need to team up with some experienced farmers who have some
    garden space that they are willing to share for labor. Otherwise, they had better stock up on dried beans and rice and water.

    • This is my greatest argument against the lone wolf survivor.
      1 person a grower
      1 person a medic
      1 person a guard
      Etc etc
      Each rotate watch duty and nurse others as needed (e.g. injury)
      Not to mention social interaction.

  • 1. Solar powered generator
    2. Small refrigerator
    3. Large supply of BOTTLED beer (this why you need 1 &2)
    4. Chips & Salsa
    5. Tums

    You may not survive long , but you will be surviving in style.

    • Solar powered generator seems to defeat the point….just harvest the solar power

  • Dale, I’m curious where you got your figure of 33 acres “to feed the average American”. With 350 million Americans each requiring 33 acres, that equates to 18 million SQUARE MILES! That’s more than four times the entire area of our country including Alaska.

  • Not sure I understand the message here, sounds like we’re talking about the advantages of living in tiny houses, and what you can do with your tiny house, and how to hang your jewelry on tiny hooks in your tiny house, and if you have a tiny house there won’t be that much to pack up and leave with your tiny house…? I must have missed that article. That brings me to my second question, if you have a tiny house on a plot or property of some kind, why do you make it sound so important and such an immanent need to….leave that property? and go where? Fight the masses for some other plot of land to hopefully put your tiny house on ? (scratching my head), if I already have a bit of land with which my tiny house is on, I would hopefully be more aware of my surroundings (being that I’ve lived there for a spell) 1. maybe have an outside garden, 2. know all escape routes if i’m unable to defend my ground, 3. friends/family know where to find me, 4. know where all the available hunting/water spots are, the list goes on.
    It just doesn’t make sense to me to “pick up and leave” unless there’s some scenario where it’s absolutely necessary and life depends on it. This article says right out of the gate that’s the second thing you do after you pack it up “pack your tiny house and bug out”… and be at a huge disadvantage like everyone else. Really?
    We’ve all read the many important articles of emergency items to store or pack in a bugout bag or vehicle, we all know that, and that’s very important, but this article seems to convey that we need a tiny house to put all these things in and split when shtf.
    Maybe someone can clarify.

  • If you had been a resident of Paradise, California, you could’ve just hitched up your tiny house and drove it way down the road… After the fire is over, you could drive it right back…

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