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urban survival Tag

When you emerged from your emergency storm shelter, you immediately noticed the eerie quiet of a total area power outage, reminding you of a cemetery. A lone dog barking in the distance snapped you out of the shock of all the destruction you were staring at.

It looked like all your neighbors had evacuated at the last minute, so all you needed was tumbleweeds and you’d have a ‘ghost town’.

You walked out into the street around the strewn wreckage, and noticed movement about a block down and saw three muscular young men with tattoos and large backpacks suspiciously looking into somebody’s damaged home. One of them was carrying a crowbar.

They spotted you and watched you move around the damaged area of your home. You got behind a corner of your house and checked your G 20-C loaded with heavy duty Buffalo 180 grain Jacketed hollow points for one in the chamber, palm slapped the bottom of the mag, re-holstered, peeked around the corner of the house and this time the menacing trio were walking slowly down the street. Coming straight toward you. And now one of them was carrying a gun…

That’s a scenario that can happen. What do you do next? Do you have the guts to make the right move to survive?

Let’s face it, prepping can get expensive. I don’t care who you are, unless you have a rather sizeable income, trying to be prepared to survive a disaster is going to take e sizeable chunk out of your budget; that is, unless you are extremely careful with your money and know how to make the most of it.

Most of us who call ourselves preppers aren’t wealthy. Oh, there are wealthy preppers; but for the most part, they’re the ones who are buying their survival retreats in New Zeeland or buying a private island.

While they may read some of the same materials you and I read, their idea of prepping is a whole lot different, simply because they can afford to do things that you and I can’t afford to do.

A car is approaching in high speed and one second after you hear the wheels rolling over bodies that collapse right next to you. You hear shotgun fires and you see people running in despair around you. You don’t know where the danger comes from and you can’t see your way out of this. You’re caught in the middle of a human turmoil that sweeps you and flows against your will.

How are you going to make it out? How are you going to survive?

The answer is simple but tricky: it’s not only the immediate actions that save you, but what you should have done before.

No matter how many times it is said, it can never be said or heard enough: “The best self defense firearm for you is the one you are proficient with, feel confident with, and are carrying in a time of need.”

In an urban environment, you have to defend yourself at close, intermediate, and long ranges. This is why you need to develop proficiency with at least one weapon in each of the three main categories of firearms: handguns, shotguns, and rifles.

For each of these groups, there are questions to think about and answer for yourself in order to decide which weapon will best meet your needs.

There are literally millions of cold weapons that already exist in urban settings, and the best ones tend to be those that don’t look like weapons at first glance, and can be easily concealed.

Here are five basic categories of cold weapons to consider.

Before choosing one for your defense, think if you can wield the weapon effectively and efficiently, how will you train your skills and stay in good form with each weapon that you decide to carry.

If hunkering down is your choice, either due to your living circumstance, or simply to avoid the hordes on the highway, your bug-in bag should have all the essentials you need.

Anything less will not only waste your time, space and money, but will pin your hopes to a fool’s promise, endangering you and others too. And water is one of those issues that you just can’t take easily when bugging in.

You probably know that a single gallon of water weighs about 8 pounds and takes up quite a bit of space. If you are having problems keeping 1-2 gallons in your living space on a regular basis, you’ll find it almost impossible to store enough water away for your long term survival.

This is just one of many reasons why you should only store away 5-10 gallons of water to get you started in a crisis, and devote your prepping to smart management and finding ways to procure water. Pulling water from the air is one of the solutions, and there are several ways you can do it.

Once you pull the moisture from the air, you will still need to make sure it is fit for drinking and bathing. But all of these obstacles can be overcome with solutions that are small enough and easy enough to store in your bug in bag.

Keep reading to see how to solve the water problem when you’re bugging in!