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food crisis Tag

It seems that there’s always some kind of disaster, either natural or manmade, that prove the value of being prepared. Even if it’s not a Red Dawn scenario, there are hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, droughts, and even job losses that just make stockpiling food smart.

But, there are some foods that you shouldn’t try to stockpile.

Some of these are foods that you just shouldn’t stockpile at all and some of them are foods that you have to stockpile in a certain way to keep them from going bad. It’s important to optimize your space, so don’t waste it on food that’s just going to go bad.

I’m going to skip listing fresh fruits and vegetables because that’s kind of a no-brainer. Bananas obviously aren’t going to store long-term. The exception is, of course, root vegetables if you have a cellar.

You have to love autumn. The leaves are changing, the air is cooling down, and the joy of the holiday season is right around the corner.

Fall is also a time to do your canning in preparation for winter. Now, if you live on a farm, you have to harvest what you have and can it, but if you’re an urban prepper who has to buy produce, then you have to plan a little better.

Unlike a farm garden that likely provides months, if not years, of food, urban preppers have to decide how much food will be necessary to get through the winter.

Then they have to decide how much you need to can based on how much space you have, how much money you have to spend on produce, how much time you have, and how much you want to invest in store-bought goods.

Then of course, you have to figure out what’s available.

So, let’s talk a little about what you need to do to optimize your fall canning plan.

Straw bale gardening is becoming a pretty big deal in some circles for several reasons. It’s essentially a form of container gardening, except the “container” is the bale of straw.

For those of you who don’t know, bales of straw are held together with two pieces of twine wrapped around it endways.

The gist of it is that you condition the bales, that is, you ready it for planting, then you put the plants in it. The straw does a couple of things.

First, it acts as an organic fertilizer, and it also gives the roots of the plant something to anchor to as they grow.

These Are The Ingenious Recipes That Helped Our Ancestors Stay Alive!

It’s only the third in line when comes to the rule of three, but you just can’t skip it in case of a crisis. You’ll need shelter first, then water to stay alive, while food will give you energy and comfort.

You have to be able to sustain your family when food will be hard to find, and have the skills to find it when you find yourself lost in the middle of disaster.

So this week is about food.

We’ve talked at length about the most nutritious vegetables to grow, and about how to choose seeds and save them for the next year.

We’ve also talked about how to build a compost pile, and do container gardening, and just about every other gardening topic that you can think of, but what about what’s just plain easy?

Now you need a list of the easiest vegetables to grow, so this is for anybody trying to make a successful first attempt at gardening.

Setting up an aquaponics system isn’t quite as easy as you may think, though it’s not brain surgery, either.

It’s also a great way to grow fish and plants at the same time, in a unobtrusive loop that provides fresh produce grown in nutrient-rich soil and a healthy protein source, raised in an environment that you know for a fact isn’t steeped in chemicals or mercury.

Plus, it’s a huge step toward self-sufficiency.

However, as with everything we do, things go wrong. That’s when it’s a good idea to turn to somebody who’s been there.

I don’t have a system myself, but I contacted some folks who do, and they gave me the lowdown on some of the most common problems to pop up in an aquaponics system so that I could share them with you.

I’ve also included some rookie mistakes that are common, so that you can maybe avoid them before you make them.