Store Veggies For Long Term Survival

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veggies

You cannot imagine how comforting it is to have fresh produce in hard times. But sometimes your garden just isn’t ready when you need it, or your availability to fresh produce isn’t ideal.  The thing is this though: fresh produce isn’t meant to stay fresh for very long. You’re usually left holding the bag if you want some good produce during a food shortage, societal breakdown or a major event. It’s not that difficult though, to get a good mix of veggies in your diet.

You can even have fresh fruit and vegetables without a huge, well-developed garden or aquaponics setup.

Now, this article is all about veggies and how to make them long term storage type foods but that’s not the only thing these articles are good for. There’s still got a ton of great information you’re going to want.

Don’t forget to stay tuned for the other articles in this series of articles. The work has already been done to uncover the best items for your long-term comfort and survival. When stressful times exist, everyone is going to want to eat great food. Here’s how:

How to keep vegetables and fruit for the long-term

OK, here’s the deal: fresh produce doesn’t last long. There are more than a few secrets with you to help you extend the lifespan of fresh cut vegetables for your storage. It’s just that you’ll need to make an accommodation to allow that to happen.

{adinserter backyardliberty}A root cellar is the answer. A what? A root cellar is a cool, humidity controlled container which allows your veggies to last for a very long time. How about lettuce that lasts for two months, garlic that will last two years, squash that will last three years or other root veggies which will last at least two years. THAT’S longevity.

This particular article is meant to whet your appetite and isn’t a big enough forum to cover the actual design and building of a root cellar (there will definitely be a few articles on that topic going forward). Let’s not get into details but simply basic concepts, for now. We WILL however talk more extensively about root cellars in the near future so we won’t be skirting that issue.

But let’s get you salivating for some fresh produce that doesn’t require a fully developed garden or hydro/aqua setup.

Which Fruits and Vegetables Will Work?

Ginger, Onions, Beets, Potatoes, Squash and Hearty leafy greens as well as cabbage are all perfect candidates for root cellaring. The usual suspects can be included of course as well, including apples, carrots, turnips, pumpkin and celery.

Each type of fruit or vegetable will require a different treatment to ensure longevity without refrigeration.  But it’s important to note that many items have substantially similar treatments, humidity levels and timelines.  For instance, cabbage and celery, leafy greens like kale and chard all store incredibly well in sand with a controlled humidity at the same level. The result is about 3-5 months peak longevity with very little waste involved.

Additionally, squash of all types, potatoes, yams, onions and turnips can all be stored in similar conditions. The key is that they are all “cured” properly in their own unique ways. So, after you prepare the items, you can store them in a very similar environment.

Root cellars are used all around the globe for storing produce.

The best part of the root cellaring ideology is that you don’t have to actually have a cellar, or even a lot of space. In third world countries, “root cellars” are often built out of terracotta pots, sand and water. An unused trashcan can be buried, incorporated with hay and newspaper and covered properly to provide a very cheap and easy to maintain root cellar.

The key to root cellaring is the controlling of humidity (some items need more, some need less). That’s the main reason why different storage vessels make some sense.

What Else Can Be Stored Long Term?

Let’s talk more about the types of food you can store though, because that’s what this is all about. Having fresh produce on hand even when you cannot guarantee access from your garden or the grocer is important.

Ginger root is an excellent vegetable for root cellaring. The rind that forms on the ginger allows the moisture to stay intact until it’s broken, and the relatively firm flesh keeps bruising to a minimum. It is bruising which causes vegetables and fruits to speed up degradation. You know that old saying: “One bad apple ruins the whole bushel”? It’s true. You need ripe, unblemished, uncut and non-bruised produce for root cellaring.

Garlic can be made to last for significant periods of time if properly stored in a root cellar. Having fresh, spicy, sharp garlic on hand can aid in a bunch of different preparations, including for medical reasons. Garlic can last 6 months on your counter, but 18 months or more in a proper root cellar situation. That’s longevity.

Beets and other similar items (like turnips and potatoes) are easy targets for root cellar advocates. These can last over a year, without any significant degradation to taste or texture. The biggest argument for a cellar is that the produce tastes infinitely better than waterlogged canned versions you buy in the store.

Get Started Now!

Now a few words to the wise: veterans of root cellaring will say without question that home grown produce lasts MUCH longer than store bought produce. If you cannot get your garden producing in time, but want to get your root cellar started there is a strategy.

Visit a local produce farm and pick high quality specimens then utilize proper “curing” techniques.  Get informed on the proper storage conditions for each variety, then combine the techniques.

P.S. Don’t worry, you won’t be left hanging on a root cellar setup, but this article was just an introduction. There is a ton of great content on food storage coming down the pipeline, because you are probably hungry for great food in your storage.

CCC3

This article has been written by Ben Worthen for Survivopedia.

© Survivopedia.com

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Comments

  1. You have whetted my appetite to try storing more veggies. We already grow several types of winter squash that carry us over the whole winter until the next crop comes in. And garlic as well carries us year round. I didn't realize that some of my yummy greens could be kept 'fresh' as well. I look forward to more instruction in this means of preservation. Thanks!!

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  2. Crystal Hayward says:

    what if you don't have root cellars or basements. I live in Fl and all we got is sand.

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    • John Pietruszkiewicz says:

      Sand is all you need. We had a root cellar in Southern New Jersey and it was in nothing but sand. The walls and roof kept the sand out.

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    • Yeah, me too. I have been trying to think of all kinds of ways to "store" food in a root cellar type environment that doesn't need electricity. I live in Orlando and right over an artesian well, so no deep digging for me. I was wondering if I built a room inside my garage and super insulated it including all 4 walls the ceiling and the floor, would that work?

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    • Larry Gorman says:

      Crystal, don't let the words cellar, or basement throw you. You can make a root cellar out of an old freezer, or convert a garden shed. It must be insulated to keep the temp in the 30 to 60 degree range and humidity is very important. Lots of good books on the subject in detail. Also, check out the Mother Earth News; great magazine and their web site has a lot of links. I'm building one here in Vermont next to my house. The structure will be essentially an outdoor room with a crushed rock floor over dirt to allow for natural humidity. Should more humidity be called for a little water on the rocks is all it takes. Make sure to use some wire mesh/fence under the rock to keep any hungry critters from seeking entry. Have fun!

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      • Charlie Wolfe says:

        Another great source for survival info is BACKWOODS HOME MAGAZINE I have gotten great info from both MENand BHM

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    • Jackie Ronco says:

      We use an old refrigerator minus the motor etc and dug a shallow hole in the ground to lay it on its back the lid can open to allow access and we keep a bucket of water in there with the carrots to keep them fresh, they last all winter. We could keep other things in there and have done so with cabbage. The newer fridges that have a separate freezer compartment would work to keep some things separated like potatoes and apples ( apples are supposed to make the potatoes sprout)

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    • My sweet potatoes lasted 10 months single-layered in cardboard boxes in a cool closet.

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  3. Very interested in Root Cellar information and looking forward to more articles. I also would like information on the construction of the cellar.

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    • We live on mountain with heavy forrest. Do not have basement and roots would hinder any digging. Am considering some type of shallow pit or heavily insulated shed.
      One suggestion is to dig pit and line with plastic then pack sandbags all around sides and the wood and solid foam insualtion top. Still looking for more ideas

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  4. Would have been helpful if the differing humidity levels for different foods being stored were given.

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  5. Thank you for your wonderful articles! They are greatly appreciated!I look forwaed to all your articles! thanks again! NRF

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  6. Enjoyed the article. Would like more information on building a small root cellar.

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  7. HI, BEEN LOOKING FOR THIS CONTENT. CAN'T WAIT TILL YOU ADDRESS KIM CHEE IN BOTTLES. I'M TOLD THAT THEY ARE PROBIOTIC AND ARE FERMENTED VEGETABLES(BOK CHOY, ETC.). ALSO, WHAT ABOUT CANNED VEGETABLES? THERE'S ONE CAN WITH BAMBOO SHOOTS, MUSHROOMS AND BEAN NOODLES. I GUESS THEY SHOULD KEEP WELL IF STORED CORRECTLY.

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  8. Heather Schaller says:

    These are great articles! Keep them coming! Can't wait for more info on root cellers. My parents had one when I was little. Now I can have my own!

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  9. not enough info at this time and where I live is not conducive to "digging" one. any other "building" methods?

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  10. Karen Patrick says:

    My Grandmother had a root cellar under her house, accessible only through a door in the floor of a bedroom kept covered by a rug. As a small child, I loved to go down there. She had potatoes, onions, pumpkins, turnips and all kinds of things, including her canned vegetables. This is a great concept.

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  11. Greg Byrd says:

    I live in Southwest Louisiana, very Humid. I would love to know how to build an inexpensive root cellar to store fruits and veggies for the long term.

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  12. Russ Maxwell says:

    I agree with Jose. I am on rock and digging is not practical. My garden is above ground.

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  13. Nancy Coffield says:

    I have 2 old ceramic pots in the basement about 2' tall, are those for storing vegetables?

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  14. Dori.jeff46 says:

    Very good article, waiting on further instructions!
    Thank you!

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  15. I live in HOT Texas & land is on bedrock so no digging even 1 foot here. Look forward to info & directions for above ground "root cellar" construction. But, love the ideas & info you're sharing. Thanks a million.

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  16. I grew up on a ranch in Colorado. We had a huge garden and a root celar dug into the side of a north facing hill with a protected entry. The cellar was divided into four sections each with a dfferent temperature and humidity for different produce. Apples don't stored like kale. Currently I have a root cellar underneath a shed. It works well for most things. Can't wait to see more information in coming weeks.

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  17. I'm 70 years old, what can I do for myself to store fresh fresh veggies, fruits and greens? I can't lift or dig anything.

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    • Hi Judy, I don't have a basement and there is no way I can have one built. I am using an extra refrigerator that my husband has in his workshop. I store onions, carrots, apples, garlic and jars of pickles and jams. The onions have lasted almost a year. They store for about 6 months but check your food storage often.

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  18. Enjoyed the articles you are publishing. Like was mentioned before about humidity levels for different foods. How could these be stored in same root cellar? I would like more information on root cellar design. I was interested in the small cellar also. How would you pack a garbage can so you would have access without disturbing other foods stored in such a small container.

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  19. I would like to try, but even caves here are 70 degrees F year round.

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    • Look up (Google) building a straw and stucco/concrete coated house. The same principle can be applied. If it's that hot where you are double the wall thickness and you will have it.

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  20. John Pietruszkiewicz says:

    A Good article, but a "teaser"! I am looking forward to information on the 'curing' of the vegetables and to some alternate possibilities to a properly dug root cellar and how to maitain proper humidity.

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    • Jeannie says:

      You dehydrate your veggies, then once they are thoroughly dried. You can crush them and put in glass ball jars with tight screw lids, like the ones used for pressure canning fruit and veggies and greens in jars, even meats. This makes it much lighter weight. The invaluable ingredients will still be in all the different veggies, fruit, greens, corn, and root veggies, like turnips, beets, etc. If no electricity is available for an electric run food dehydrator. My Grandparents and Mom who lived through the Great Depression days. They would slice the veggies, fruit, or whatever they wanted to dry. The placed the slices on a flat surface like a flat tray or sheet pan. Then put clothespins around the top with cheese cloth to keep insects out while the fruit or veggies, etc. were drying. Then they stored the dried goods in glass jars with tight lids, and used as they needed to. Dehydrated food lasts for years, as long as they are thoroughly dried all the water content out. Then when you are ready to use.......just soak in some water until they swell close to back to the size they were before drying the water content out.

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      • Jeannie says:

        I need to make a correction on my Post.
        I'm smart, but I have some traumatic brain injury and I can't always say my sentences clearly., at first I'm sorry for that.
        My corrections are:
        To DEHYDRATE Any Veggies, or Fruits and even Greens: Thoroughly clean any fruit or veggies you want to store for long periods, is NECESSARY and COMMON SENSE.
        To dehydrate without any electricity available. After cleaning each variety of fruit or veggie. Slice thin where it won't take so long for the sun to dehydrate. Lay the slices over a flat surface, like sheet pan, pie pans, and the like. Once you lay out the slices. Get some cheese cloth which is very thin, but air can circulate through it, but it is threaded fine enough to keep all bugs out. Cover the sheet pan with the raw fruit or veggie's sliced thin, and you can use anything that will keep the wind from blowing off the cheesecloth. My Grandparents and Mom used clothespins to keep the cheesecloth stretched out, and secured to the edges of the sheet pan, so nothing can eat your food. On hot days when the Sun is out all day. The Sun will dry out veggies and fruit pretty fast, as long as the slices are not too thick. They certainly will not go bad drying out in the sun. But be sure to keep checking them, and once they are real dried, take them inside, and put the dried fruit in jars. Glass jars using tight seals will keep all moisture out, humidity, and will last a very long time. Just because you dry your food, as in dehydrating it. No nutrient value is lost, you just need to add some water, for the fruits or veggies to swell back up with the water rehydration. Then use as you would to bake a pie, or eat as a dried fruit snack.
        If you are limited for space. You can take separately, but each of the dried fruit or veggie, and grind it to like a drinkable powder consistency. By this you can put more veggies or fruit into the glass jar, firmly tightened. Then in emergency, just add some water and drink it like a smoothie without ice, or as a veggie/fruit drink. I hope I am making sense. You just spoon out the crushed fruit or veggies, to your taste. My point is it saves a lot of space with using glass jars. But glass jars like the ones you use to pressure can veggies and fruit. They work best because they don't leech bad stuff into your food. Using plastics leech the chemicals the plastic is made out of, into your food. So don't use plastic containers to store your foods for long periods of time. Rodents and such can't open a glass jar either; nor can ants and bugs. You could even mix some of your crushed veggies, and make like a V-8 drink out of it. The same for fruit done this way. Your body is getting the nutrients your body needs.

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      • Vacuum sealers with jar attachments are used to seal mason jars now.

        I have many shelves full and I just started last summer.
        I plan on drying the old way(with no power) as you mentioned our grandparents did.
        I have a brake bleeder to seal the jars with when there is no electricity.

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  21. Sam and Joeys Grama says:

    I am so fortunate. I have a spring just down the hill from my house. It ran all last year through the drought, so we had water for the animals. I would love it if you could include some information for the old idea of a "spring house" or well house. Nice constant temperature coming out of the pipe, but I'm not sure exactly what to do with it. My Grandma had a root cellar, everyone did then, but she didn't have a spring house. Thanks.

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  22. I have a basement extension room that is partially surrounded by dirt and partially exposed, with an outside door. Cool in summer, dosen't freeze in winter. Maybe a perfect root cellar. I want more info please!!

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  23. Judy, I'm 68 and live by myself. I have had to modify my growing of fruits and veggies. My garden is 150' X 60'. I had a neighbor put up an 8' fence to keep wayward children and animals out. Within the garden I added a greenhouse that holds my raised beds (no bending) for growing my fresh food into fall and early winter. I have the fence lined with my "berries" of all kinds and corn with vining veggies growing up the corn stalks. In the area not in use by the greenhouse I have my "root" veggies, such as potatoes, beets, and so on. I have some serious medical conditions that limit my activity so I think of ways to lessen the strain on my body. Raised growing beds so you don't have to dig, plant items that can grow up to your level without having to do a lot of bending, grow things in hanging baskets. Just get crazy with your imagination to make things get easier on yourself. Most of the items I grow are dehydrated because of the lack of storage space. But I am getting excited about storing my food in a root celler. I just have to figure out where to put it. Never give up, never give up. Life is too beautiful to let it pass you by.

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    • Kathleen, I'm 65 and also acquiring physical disabilities. Loved your comments about what you've done already with gardening. We live on 5 acres, planning the greenhouse on the side of a barn, planning a storm shelter/root cellar. Just not sure where to start. Gardening vegetables and my flower gardening is starting to be a challenge. Thanks for your ideas.

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      • My name is Pam N. I too am getting older (66) this year; and gardening is getting more challenging. Love the concept of being self sufficient, root cellars, and a greenhouse on the side of the barn. I also live on 5 acres, have rabbits and plan to get goats and chickens again. Keep up the good ideas.

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  24. Humidity is a huge factor where I live. As is a very very hard to dig ground...I'm hoping you will or can create a chart of some sort that will show different ideas for alternate environment living conditions... Also wanted to thank you for your hard work, great ideas and dedication in sharing your wealth of knowledge. I as I'm sure others appreciate it very much! Looking forward to your next article!!! 🙂

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  25. Charlotte Franklin says:

    Would like different ways to store food. Our ground is very rocky and hard. Thank you for sharing.

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  26. Interesting. Expecting more. I grew up with grandparents who had three root cellars, the largest was driven into with team and wagon. Both sides of it had bins for various vegetables and fruits. Straw, dead leaves, grasses and canvas covers were used variously for insulation and humidity control. Another was an old stone homestead house with a two-foot-deep dirt and sod roof. It was a walk-in, and we carried crops in by the bushel. These two were a quarter and a half mile from the barn and our home. From a side door in the house were steps leading down into a more accessible root cellar, also used for regular canned fruit,
    homemade rootbeer and wine. We had a double-walled ice house which held ice blocks all summer which had been cut from the nearby river in winter-time. It's roof was thick dirt and sod, and its sides were all covered with thick ivy vines. All the farm work was done by my grandparents, my mother, and a part-time hired hand. I was little, but when not off at grade school was busy at planting potatoes, shucking corn, feeding stock,etc. A good life; wish for it a lot now at age 81.

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    • Peggy S. says:

      The work done back then was to survive. Your just a bit older but we had to grow our own to live during the war for the winter since there wasn't much at those times to buy anything living in the city. We traveled to an old family place for the summer into the country for canned all summer long veggie we grew and orchards we visited near by for "drops" of apples, pears, peaches as well as wild berries picked needing qts full to feed 6 all done on the wood stove too!

      Sure do remember boating and swimming in the creek as well as picking worms off the lawn at night to put onto the tops of the boxes of leaves (dampened) we collected so we could fish anytime as long as you picked and put all in the worms back on top to dig their own hole down each time.

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  27. Hello all of you worried about digging deep....It's all about insulation! If you build a house out of one single layer of straw bales it would maintain about 50 degrees F year round no matter how hot or cold it gets. The same holds true for earth and rock...deep in caves the temp is very constant year round! The rest is all about vents and moving air...ventilation. All of this can be Googled and all the information is there. It's the same principle as an underground shelter.

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  28. Hi, I am 73 and I am going to attempt my first garden! We have plots at church which is a mile away. I will attempt to do the root cellar plants. I have kept some bananas and grapefruit in my storage off the patio as we have many cool nights in Portland, Or. Potatoes have been out there as well. The instruction to build
    for your garden was way over my head. I wonder who was successful in building and adding the fish tank. I will also get dry products. Many products last me
    a long time but if necessary I plan to share with family. Thank you.

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  29. I am looking forward to learning more on how to store my veggies...I have always had a big garden and can or freeze most of my veggies but I would love to be able to store fresh food for longer periods. Thanks for all the info coming down the pipeline!

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    • Have you heard about "green bags"? I am able to keep fresh beets, carrots, etc through the winter- about 8 months when putting in green bags. And they are great tasting! I think I found them originally online, but have also seen them at Walmart.

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    • Jeannie says:

      You dehydrate your veggies, then once they are thoroughly dried. You can crush them and put in glass ball jars with tight screw lids, like the ones used for pressure canning fruit and veggies and greens in jars, even meats. This makes it much lighter weight. The invaluable ingredients will still be in all the different veggies, fruit, greens, corn, and root veggies, like turnips, beets, etc. If no electricity is available for an electric run food dehydrator. My Grandparents and Mom who lived through the Great Depression days. They would slice the veggies, fruit, or whatever they wanted to dry. The placed the slices on a flat surface like a flat tray or sheet pan. Then put clothespins around the top with cheese cloth to keep insects out while the fruit or veggies, etc. were drying. Then they stored the dried goods in glass jars with tight lids, and used as they needed to. Dehydrated food lasts for years, as long as they are thoroughly dried all the water content out. Then when you are ready to use…….just soak in some water until they swell close to back to the size they were before drying the water content out.
      ------------
      I need to make a correction on my Post.
      I’m smart, but I have some traumatic brain injury and I can’t always say my sentences clearly., at first I’m sorry for that.
      My corrections are:
      To DEHYDRATE Any Veggies, or Fruits and even Greens: Thoroughly clean any fruit or veggies you want to store for long periods, is NECESSARY and COMMON SENSE.
      To dehydrate without any electricity available. After cleaning each variety of fruit or veggie. Slice thin where it won’t take so long for the sun to dehydrate. Lay the slices over a flat surface, like sheet pan, pie pans, and the like. Once you lay out the slices. Get some cheese cloth which is very thin, but air can circulate through it, but it is threaded fine enough to keep all bugs out. Cover the sheet pan with the raw fruit or veggie’s sliced thin, and you can use anything that will keep the wind from blowing off the cheesecloth. My Grandparents and Mom used clothespins to keep the cheesecloth stretched out, and secured to the edges of the sheet pan, so nothing can eat your food. On hot days when the Sun is out all day. The Sun will dry out veggies and fruit pretty fast, as long as the slices are not too thick. They certainly will not go bad drying out in the sun. But be sure to keep checking them, and once they are real dried, take them inside, and put the dried fruit in jars. Glass jars using tight seals will keep all moisture out, humidity, and will last a very long time. Just because you dry your food, as in dehydrating it. No nutrient value is lost, you just need to add some water, for the fruits or veggies to swell back up with the water rehydration. Then use as you would to bake a pie, or eat as a dried fruit snack.
      If you are limited for space. You can take separately, but each of the dried fruit or veggie, and grind it to like a drinkable powder consistency. By this you can put more veggies or fruit into the glass jar, firmly tightened. Then in emergency, just add some water and drink it like a smoothie without ice, or as a veggie/fruit drink. I hope I am making sense. You just spoon out the crushed fruit or veggies, to your taste. My point is it saves a lot of space with using glass jars. But glass jars like the ones you use to pressure can veggies and fruit. They work best because they don’t leech bad stuff into your food. Using plastics leech the chemicals the plastic is made out of, into your food. So don’t use plastic containers to store your foods for long periods of time. Rodents and such can’t open a glass jar either; nor can ants and bugs. You could even mix some of your crushed veggies, and make like a V-8 drink out of it. The same for fruit done this way. Your body is getting the nutrients your body needs.

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  30. Valentina says:

    Sauerkraut will be a staple in my cellar. Making it is a piece of cake. Not only is it delicious but also gets loaded with probiotics the longer it sits. Probiotics (the good bacteria) is the best medicine for all kinds of sicknesses, illnesses, infections, upset stomach, in addition to garlic-my other staple). It is even good for depression if eaten daily. The longer it's stored the more probiotics it develops. You only need 2 ingredients make it... Cabbage & salt (I do like to add a little grated carrot, but thats optional) shred cabbage, add celtic or Himalayan salt. Work it in with your hands until cabbage releases it's juices. It should taste just a tiny bit saltier than youd prefer to eat. Its best to work in small batches in a big glass punch bowl. Pack it into clean mason jars (can sterilize by putting a little boiled water in jar, close lid, swish around, pour out & dry with clean towel) along with the precious juices it released & leave a little room on top for fermentation process. Store in cellar. Will keep for years. The longer it stays the better it gets, and a little will go a long after that. 2 TB/day is the amount to take after it's fermented for a while to get probiotics recommended. Enjoy!!

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  31. If the big one is coming as you say, than how do you keep people from stealing your food??? Starving people will do anything for food!!!! I can't stay awake for 24 hours. I live in Fl with lots of neighbors. What happens if they didn't prepare for survival??

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    • Peggy S. says:

      It's called "KEEP THINGS SECRET" even from family. I have watched Dooms Day type shows on satellite TV and rarely does anyone say they are storing food because of the same reasons you mention. I have dehydrating food for a long time with a very inexpensive type machine by Nestco it was from a large hunting supply company but the veggies are all dried and stored by removing the air in the jars afterwards by an attachment to the Foodsaver machine able to be re-closed again and again. All that is fine but I'm tired of pealing, cooking then grating the potatoes just to dry them and keep them white. So I'm looking for a way that brought me here to actually store them longer. I watched all the videos on the net. But do NOT want tons of can goods because I hate store bought cans of anything but good baked beans!

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  32. Jerry Larsen says:

    Wow! What a wonderful site.

    As an active Morman (Latter Day Saint) We have been preparing for food shortages and bad times. At 75 my wife and I volunteer as cannery managers at our church cannery. Members and non members can purchase and can Beens, rice, wheat, sugar, flour, etc
    I am going to figure a way to do a root celler, even though we live in gated retirement area with lots of ccrs. (Fancy name for modular home park)

    Thanks ever so much to all those who contribute to this site.

    If interested in using the church cannery, go on line to provident livening.org.

    Jerry and Loretta Larsen
    Modesto, CA

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  33. Peggy S. says:

    I live in the mountains so it is rocky and do gardening in buckets and raised beds. I have a basement but with the area being dug into the mountain it is 56 degrees all the time but I have a dehumidifier so mildew doesn't grow on everything that has to be emptied every 2 days or so in the summer. Should I put the veggies in damp/wet sand in a trashcan for storage or just Rubbermaid containers with lids on for the sand to stay damp better for each kind? I don't want to spend good time and money without more knowledge.

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  34. Peggy S. says:

    http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/factsheets/vegetables/storage.pdf

    This site on the next page down starts the charts for food storage temperatures and length of time for storage.

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  36. Ron Langevin says:

    Great stuff, now how about how to store a rifle, shotgun, handgun and ammo for ea.

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    • Sure! Read some tips about storing your guns and ammo here: http://www.survivopedia.com/keeping-guns-ready-dos-donts/

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  37. I kept farm fresh sweet potatoes for 10 months spread single layer in cardboard boxes in a cool closet.

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Trackbacks

  1. […] SOURCE : http://www.survivopedia.com/store-veggies-for-long-term-survival/ […]

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  2. […] P.S. Don’t worry, you won’t be left hanging on a root cellar setup, but this article was just an introduction. There is a ton of great content on food storage coming down the pipeline, because you are probably hungry for great food in your storage. – Survivopedia […]

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  3. […] When placed in a sunny location, it will produce a minimum of 10 degrees reduction in temperature, and as much as 30 degrees lower on a hot, dry day. With the addition of a fan, this device can produce even lower temperatures that will enable you to store perishable items. […]

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  4. […] When placed in a sunny location, it will produce a minimum of 10 degrees reduction in temperature, and as much as 30 degrees lower on a hot, dry day. With the addition of a fan, this device can produce even lower temperatures that will enable you to store perishable items. […]

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  5. […] 15. Not all fresh fruits and vegetables store the best for the long-term. Learn which ones work best in root cellars. […]

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  6. […] pressure, watch out for the sodium content because salt is often used as a preservative. Be sure to get a variety of colors because each one offers different nutrients. For example, oranges and reds are high in vitamins A […]

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